Somalia: Presidential Candidate Gelle hails Somaliland Senate elections as ‘fair and transparent’

Presidential Candidate Gelle hails Somaliland Senate elections as 'fair and transparent' Photo courtesy

Somalia Presidential Candidate, Dahir Mohamud Gelle has applauded the just concluded Upper House (Senate) elections for the 11 seats representing Somaliland.

Mr. Gelle termed the election in which 46 clan delegates voted for the 11 seats as “a free and transparent process”.

“First, I would like to congratulate the honorable senators from Somaliland for their election victory to join the 11th Parliament of Somalia,” said Gelle.

The poll took place on Wednesday and Thursday, inside a highly secured hall near the Mogadishu International Airport with the attendance of international and local observers.

“I commend the electoral process which took place in accordance with the law. An election which both the winners and losers were satisfied,” Gelle added.

As many local observers noted, the former-diplomat-turned presidential aspirant Gelle said the election of the Somaliland’s Upper House seats was very different from others previously conducted by Federal Member States.

“”Unlike what the [Farmaajo] regime used to do, the Somaliland elections have been held in a free, fair and democratic manner,” he adds pointing the recent elections in other regional states which have been largely influenced by Villa Somalia.

Gelle also praised Prime Minister Mohamed Hussein Roble for his leadership in ensuring the election process takes place smoothly.

“I also commend the Prime Minister for his role and commitment to guarantee that the Somaliland election becomes a role model for other elections,” he added.

As Somaliland delegates accomplished the voting on Thursday, 46 out the 54 Upper House Seats of the Somali Federal Parliament have been occupied.

Presidential elections are scheduled to be held in Somalia after the parliamentary polls are concluded. It follows months of political deadlock and violence ensued by the delayed elections and lack of consensus by the political leaders.

Source; Horn Observer

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